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Archive for April, 2009

Topic 5: Collaborative practice

Posted by arlekeno on April 20, 2009

Response to Fullen: The deep meaning of inside collaboration.

Schools ARE NOT businesses, I think Fullen needs to tell the Governtment this.

Fullen talks alot about how to make change happen, he works well with my view that YOu need to want to change, you need to support people who want to change, and you need to allow the change, amazingly this does not always happen even when change is ordered ( from top down 馃槢 ) I like the phrase Metanoma… sometimes we need ot make people want to cahnge.

BUT every situation is different and you can’t change everything at once.

Interesting thoughts their on the role of emotions, we make decisions when emotions dictate as well, kind of like Neccesity and invention?

Finally, I liked the bit about the school teachers who wetn away calling their own staff meetings to teach what they learned. At some schools getting a faculty meeting is hard enough!

Responses to Senge: In聽The Jossey-Bass reader on educational leadership

Senge talks very reasonable about change taking YEARS to happen.

When he talks of being part of a great team, i think most of stage managing. Alas, not work.

Again we see emphasis on interconnectedness of all things.. I wonder if this is an enviromental science influence on our socitey or just commmon sense finally coming through?

QUESTIONS?

I see many carry overs from this interconnectedness and clear goals in a learning organisation and the collaberation and goals of RBL we say in topic 2.

TABLE

The table is interesting, but I think it uses extremes of most examples, I think that my school is on its way to being an L.O. but not there yet, so I see parts of both.

I can understand why people like routines, to be fully integrated would would require breaking down the familiar and easy habits such as planning lessons yourself, alone, and Faculties.

response to Cibulka: Schools as learning organisations: A review of the literature.

I like this summary, but it does go from sometimes being VERY clear, to being very airy fairy.

I agree totally that ONE SHOT workshops are not effective, (especially if only one member of a faculty goes..聽N.B. DET STAFFING!)

I also like the concept of DEPRIVATISATION of practice. At the moment we are all very private. ( How will merit pay affect collaboration, overseas it has been a block to teachers sharing resources, how will it work when you have to work SO MUCH with others?)

FINAL QUESTION? who pays?

response to page: Developing the school resource centre program: A developmental approach. In K. Haycock (Ed.), Foundations for effective school library media programs

The three phases of development are good 1)聽establish systems and structures. 2) Establish a profile and team planning. 3) Establishing school wide programme. 聽Nice and clear and obvious with a list of what needs to be done ( how do we make the executive do it? how to get us on the committees? or in some cases, get the committees listened to? And when do we find time to do all this when operating on almost half the staffing hours that ASLA recomends for school libraries?).

Really just more of the same though.

N.B. I also like the notes about clearly defining the role of the T.L. My expectatons have changed a bit since I started the readings, (Assess task 1 anybody?).

Response to Lange :聽Does collaboration boost student learning?

YES, Budgets are under pressure ( and CPT takes time and thus, money) Anad again we must sell ourselves AS WELL as collaborte AND have proof we are worthwhile… sigh.

OOHH, JUST HAD A THOUGHT, as part of an ICT class, get students to learn how to use the library, its the most closely related discipline today and would go back to earlier topics about library and Computing staff working together.

OH, Two teachers keep students on task better than one? SHOCKER 馃槢 I think this is the kind of link I would post to a library webstite though for parents to read, short, easy to understand and very pro-us.

Response to Harvey: 聽The Rookie: A primer to help you survive your first year with flying colours,

OOhh, Supporting Executive, nice, Meetings with people. This man lived in an ideal world for his first job!

N.b readings by Todd and Gibbs unavailable.

Based on your reading on this topic so far:

  1. What are the challenges posed by CPT?

Where to begin? The natural inertia of a system, the lack of support from executives, resistance from teachers, the extra work (or at least, new and different work) involved of collaborating, the lack of independence of working with others ( though some may like this), the Extra time and money it may take to set up, personality clashes, scheduling, staff in multiple faculties ( though this may also be a good thing) and the bashing anything teachers do in the Daily Telegraph.

  1. Does the teacher librarian have a positive role to play in the curriculum or should CPT be abandoned?

Naturally, we are teachers, we have resources at our finger tips and the knowledge of its use. We have the space ( and if properly supplied with SAS staff,) the time.

  1. In your opinion where does the truth lie?

I think with Quality teaching, we could make this happen, but there are many obstacles, this would be a wonderful thing. if EVERYONE involved got behind it, but we do not live in a perfect world, life聽 ( or in this case, work) gets in the way.

  1. How well do you believe that the CPT model picks up on the factors given by Senge, and Watkins and Marsick from the previous section?

聽 I think all of these readings are reading from teh same page.

The role of the teacher librarian is fulfilled in a school that believes in collaborative practice and where teachers are leaders. But many teachers see working with other teachers as a major challenge. In fact they might fight against this.

  1. In such circumstances what would be an appropriate response from the teacher librarian?

Well I suggest just working with teachers who do want to work withyou, and let your results show, trying to work with a teacher who doesn’t want to is a waste of your time when you are busy, and going to the Head to get support can just raise more barriers.

  1. From your reading so far, can you build a convincing argument for collaboration between the teacher librarian, principal and teachers at a school that you know?

Yes, but there always has been one.

response to Wolcott: Understanding how teachers plan: Strategies for successful instructional partnerships.聽School Library Media Research,

聽Acknowledging th ereasons why collabortion does not happen, good. The attitudes expressed her ewill all have to be overcome ( again something to look at in Task 1?) . \

The look at HOW teachers plan is briliant, non-linear, often not on paper, not something easily colloborated with.

Response to Montiel-Overall: A theoretical understanding of teacher and librarian collaboration,

Good point that their may be a difference between how a Yera 6 teacher and聽a T.L. may view learning.

Lots of emphasis on equal partners in collaboration. The RBL taxonomy is very useful and clear. I would say most teachers at my school operate at level 3 to 5, and some at 6. Ad as for the Media specialist taxonomy. Most teachers are below level 6.

I also like that T.L.s are not expected to be at the highest level of collaboration at all time with all teachers, we are ONLY HUMAN!

All this though, the trust, familiarity, moving from low to high level will take YEARS! (and exective support).

聽I like how collaboration will lead us to better know what to order for the collection, we can use that argument well.

Brown and Harada Readings not working.

I could not read Harada, but there is no action research going on in any school I know of in the Library. ( I have seen it at my school in other facultes though).

Posted in Library, Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Topic 3: RBL and IL as curriculum

Posted by arlekeno on April 15, 2009

response to Campbell, et al聽: Resource-based learning.

Mia Dio! Wiki being used in universities? :O聽聽聽聽聽 just as an aside, I find this style MUCH easier to read than a lot of other formats the readings have come in.

The scenario makes things much more clear (as opposed to just saying what it is) and I would love to have seen the power points made by kiddies ( but not had to go through all the web searching… which i did once last week already, i guess I am used to it though).

I do like this line a lot. Resource-based learning is predicated upon the principle that individual learners will be drawn to the media and content which best match their own processing skills and learning styles (Farmer, 1999). I think it shows one of the great strentghs of RBL… the other one being we use stuff we have access too 馃槢

I am also paying a lot of attention to the Rubric and TIMELINE of a unit. Rubrics given to students are now common practice n High schools, but a clear timetable given in advance is not.

Good look at the Challenges as well in this article.

Responses to School Library Association of Queensland (SLAQ) (2008): Resource-based learning

More of the same really, again emphasising the sense of self worth students get from RBL, oh, and enjoyment. Both good things 馃槈 Not to mention an ABILITY TO USE THE media cntre ( that is the Library… huzzah!)

Response to Qu’Appelle Valley School Division and Regina Catholic Schools, Saskatchewan Ministry of Education (2004-2005). Resource-based learning,

A VERY good definition (despite some jargon in the preface). I particularly like some of the links, e.g. curriculum content, where there are specific ways to use RBL for different subjects.

Response to : http://online.cesanet.adl.catholic.edu.au/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-7133/statement+on+information+literacy.pdf

It seems a good statement on info literacy, i would like a little less jargon in it but I would like to see all students and parents reading this so they know that a computer lesson is not just searching on wikipedia or playing games.

But again it does make me think in terms of the evolving role of the T.L. how we have to change ( a little) to help students be able o fit this new world order. I think one of the problems though ( as it has been at my school for several years) is making stdents see the need for higher order thinking ( or tha other students in other schools use it… i hope) because this higher order thinking is very much involved intrue information literacy. Just look at steps 4 and 6 below.

The six steps of the information process

Learning is not linear. Students will need to revisit, reformulate and reflect on their learning through

these six steps. The steps are spiraling, not linear.

1.

Defining Determining the nature and purpose of the task

2.

Locating Seeking information sources and retrieving information

3.

Selecting Selectively and critically examining the information

4.

Organizing Recording, synthesizing and reconstructing the information to suit the task

5.

Presenting Creating and presenting the information; generating new perspectives and knowledge

6.

Evaluating. Assessing the process and making judgements about their learning

(Adapted from the original model of Eisenberg and Berkowitz 1988)

I also like the clearly defined roles. e.g.

The responsibility of the teacher-librarian

provide an efficient and accessible library service and resources to support student learningJust as an aside, the two points which are newest to me and I have thought about most since starting this point are the ones about working with the IT staff, it makes sense, and to PLAN WITH teachers, both of these are given far more emphasis than I had expected, and as such I think they must be given more priority than I was givng them.

work with technology staff to ensure a planned approach to the use of information and communication technologieswork with teachers to plan, develop, teach and assess resource-based units of worktake a leadership role in planning a whole school approach to resource based learning and information literacy skillswork with and school leadership team to ensure resource-based learning is a major focus and is included in the school鈥檚 curriculum plan

Response to the http://www.curriculum.edu.au/.

Actualley I was at this site only last week looking at their journal. But there is a LOT of really useful things in there, esp in projects/resources that could save us a lot of time.

Response to The teacher librarian toolkit for an information literate school community:,

I love the line about T.L.s being at the forefront of Technology, I think we use technology more daily than most other teachers would.

LOL! the internet is like a library with the books on the floor. (yes, I am using chatspeak in my blog today).

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Topic 6: Management implications

Posted by arlekeno on April 14, 2009

Just so you know, I am taking some peoples advice and skipping to Topic 6. Hopefully this will allow me to get a decent crack at the first assesment task which I am way behind on ( yay pneumonia).

Topic 6.1: Itnro to management.

Response to Sanders, R. (2004): Chapter 13: Conflict resolution.

All this conflict resolution stuff we know, it is just that we often need to be reiminded.. especially when emotional.

I don’t think I can find three new things i have learned from this piece, but I may need assertiveness training, so I don’t feel reluctant to take time off (until the situation is really bad) or I am more prepared to just tell bosses what I think .

Response to Covey, S.R. (1989): The seven habits of highly effective people

All this seems more relevant to my personal life than my professional life, though there are a few things i could change professionally, like taking more risks ( even if they could get me fired)… just not during a recession. I do like this habit 3: put first things first. I guess to me, this means don’t procrastinate or let minor things in the way of big things.

I like the time management matrix, it is a very logical and easy to understand way to set the dilemma of time management out. I fear i may recognise myself some days as being quadrant heavy… just at times involving deadlines ( such as special provisions applications or the first essay in this unit after being sick for a month!) luckily though, I can say I am not here daily.

OOHH, I like Pareto Principle. 80% of results flow out of 20% of activities. ( makes you wonder why you bother with the rest of the time? ). The concept of using quadrant 2, to me seems a lot like, a stitch in time saves nine, an ounce of prevention v a pound of cure, and putting something away for a rainy day combined. I can see it everywhere, even in football refereeing, if I am too lax at the start of the game, problems/fouls can occur later, but if i am heavy handed first up, then the game is usually smooth. This is the same for classes and for when I was managing teachers aides time.

Response to:http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2007/05/2007052301c/careers.html

I like how Covey talks of INTERDEPENDENCE, to be part of an actual team. I think this is important to our role.

I dislike him calling T.L.s human though, we are far superior to that! lol

Was a bit shocked there would be no reference desk ( i hope they have one still there combined with other functions, not everyone is good at finding things and using the photocopier).
THe idea of an online reference desk intrigues me, especially the after hours bit… could we employ a librarian in India to stay online past our closing time? And I like the idea of students booking consltation times with T.Ls as they do with proffesors. (would also be a good way to measure supply and demand, think EBL).

Repsonse to Webber: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/24/senge.html

There is a universla resistor to change? not just intertia or dumb?

it is the machine age itself! We are not machines.

I can see the problems with the Hero-leader idea which is not change friendly. I wonder how much this concept has caused the current Global financial crisis?



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Topic 2.6: Consolidating Evidence.

Posted by arlekeno on April 13, 2009


Response to Olberg: Looking for the evidence: Do school libraries improve student achievement?

Again, more talk about us needing to know or research so we can advocate/advertise ourselves.

I am keen to look at my school鈥檚 Naplan results, but not sure how I can show the Libraries role. HHmmm. Oohh, it is suggested next page, compare the results of teachers who use library and those that don鈥檛.. MWAHAHA (yes, I am leep deprived at the moment).

And I LOVE The findings of this

1) The better funded the library, the better the test scores, regardless of socio-economic background;

2) The more money for staffing and for collection management, the better the Library and thus results;

3) The more the T.L. is utilized by students and staff, the better the results.

And I am also happy to see the results backed up in HAY鈥檚 articles ( when the links were working).

Further Readings…

The end of the Teacher Librarian, Herring.

Did teachers think the Gutenberg press would mean the end of schools? and great Library questions. Anyone have research going back that far?

Action research: How teacher-librarians can build evidence of student learning.

Could not get link to open 馃槮

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Topic 2: Accountability and research

Posted by arlekeno on April 13, 2009

Topic 2.4 Online support :

I love that there are both Myspace and facebook pages in this list?

Topic 2.5 Accountability and research

Response to ASLA: Learning for the future.

1) No

2) Yes, but not as much as T.L.s do, no one says we may not need teachers.

3) No one knows what we do and there are no hard and fast ways to measure our contribution.

Response to the Eduscape website: http://eduscapes.com/sms/program/evaluation.html

http://eduscapes.com/sms/program/accountability.html

first link could not be open. http://eduscapes.com/sms/program/evidence.html

After looking at the library media evaluation, it looked as if for the library to be evaluated, libraries would actually have to make their own way of being evaluated, and even then it was all very subjective.

The article on accountability was frightening, and with all the talk of the fighting we need to do to keep our position in schools, let alone keeping us in that position, why are we bothering to study when the job may not exist soon?

It seems like we need to do more things to make the rest of the school feel better and less real work.

Responses to Todd: Irrefutable evidence: How to prove you boost student achievement,

Finally a clear example of evidence based practice.

Thought I wonder what her colleagues thought of her doing a survey which showed their weaknesses.

How many other positions in schools require the staff to gather evidence that they are doing a good job, I wonder.

But I will start doing it, keep evidence of notices we put up, we already keep track of every senior student who comes in on their study period etc.

Evidence-based practice and school libraries.

I must admit I do see merit to the statement that in future the hallmarks of the 21st C library will be tracking and improving student outcomes and showing that we do this.

I like the 6 guidelines Todd lists, easy to understand and to put into practice.

1) Know the research and know the research intimately;

2) Make visible the research foundations of your practice in your school;

3) Make student learning outcomes the centre of your evidence;

4) Integrate evidence-generating strategies in your practice that focus on learning outcomes;

5) Mesh results of local evidence of learning outcomes to other evidence in the school, as well as with existing research to establish evidence based claims, and to build a continuous improvement plan.

6) Disseminate, celebrate and build together on evidence based outcomes

I do, however dislike 4 and 6. Point 4 because it encourages only doing things that you will be able to look good doing and 6 because it seems like self promotion. However, if this is what needs to be done with our time instead of helping kids so in the rest of the time we can help kids, so be it.

This does tie in with linking articles about school achievement and library use on the website nicely, I shall have to do that next term.

There is a lot of talk about 鈥渓ibrary lessons鈥 my school does not have library lessons anymore, and at the local primary school the library lesson where the classroom teacher used to come in with the class has been replaced by the librarian taking it alone. This means less time to teach the students how to use a library, and as such information technology.

I especially like on pg 74/5 the list of things students get from the library, I may try and get some students at my school to do this.

When we present all the good things we do, how do we talk about kids who are in the biblio so they can avoid being bullied, or the kids with anxiety issues who need a quiet and stable place? The number of times a stressed teacher has come to the library for a chat and a cup of tea? These things are close to immeasurable, but would be noticed by the people involved as soon as they were gone.

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Topic 2.3: Principal support.

Posted by arlekeno on April 13, 2009

Responses to Hartzell: Why should principals support school libraries?

Yes, we know principals should do it, We all know the benefits to students and teachers etc, so why don鈥檛 all of them do it? That is what I want to know. Hartzell鈥檚 only hints are:

a) People don鈥檛 know what Librarian can do.

b) Money/staffing limitations (which affect ordering and opening hours too).

Response to Haycock: Fostering collaboration, leadership and information literacy: Common behaviors of uncommon principals and faculties.

Haycock says we can鈥檛 just be literate in one area, we need it all school and collaborative, but Haycock talks more about the difficulties, and blames a school culture if it doesn鈥檛 happen, and it ultimately rests on the Principal to make it happen.

SO the principal has to have a vision, plan it, make it happen, connect everyone.

Teacher Librarians also need to be committed, have stamina and energy and general leadership qualities. (hard when a T.L. has been exhausted by the exact opposite of all that should be happening).

Responses to Oberg: Developing the respect and support of school administrators.

Ok, the opening line says a HELL of a lot, the biggest challenge is to get support and respect from School administrators.

I like this already, and I am only up to page2! Am I invisible?

I wonder how much time a T.L. would need with the Head, or in fact, in a day, to make what is meant to happen a reality.

In short, most of what is meant to happen, doesn鈥檛 and there are many reasons for it, as I have listed above, but I am sure as hell not going into specifics because I want to keep my job and this forum is not anonymous enough for me to post it.

Response to Everhart: Principals’ evaluation of school librarians: A study of strategic and nonstrategic evidence-based approaches.

I was hoping this was done by principals themselves so we could hear there side, but it鈥檚 still good, interesting to see Teacher Librarians are judged by same standards as teachers, despite teaching being only a small part of the role.

It reminds me of the situation I am in with the new Teachers institute, a govt. initiative that all teachers will eventually have to use, but it is set up for classroom teachers, so in short, T.L. may not be able to advance in the institute, and as such be severely disadvantage.

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Topic 2.2: information literate school community

Posted by arlekeno on April 13, 2009


Response to Henri: The information literate school community 2: Issues of leadership

Yes we have a lot of information and we need to know how to use it. I like the paraphrase of Wittgenstein though ” only has value if an individual has learned how to use it”. I guess teaching the how to use it ( as well as which info to use) is our job 馃榾

I do agree with the statement ” Learning is nothing more than self-understanding: Reformulating information for oneself”. For a long time I have always said you do not really understand something unless you can explain it (teach聽 it) to another. It is why teachers like to make students do presentations 馃槢

The six action imperatives ( that is a fancy way of saying things you need to do!) remind me of regular TEACHER AS FACILITATOR stuff. (which is great when you can make it happen).

*Create continuous learning opportunities.聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽 *Promote inquiry and dialogue. *Encourage collaboration and team learning. * Establish systems that聽 capture & share learning. * Empower people towards a collective vision. * Connect the organization to its environment.

And I believe he is right when he says 鈥渢he place of information technology and the need to work through networks is becoming compulsory鈥. Especially if we want to make the above 6 things happen, if we want to keep up to date with the rest of the world, and all this is a good thing if we, the T.L.s manage a lot of it J

Again though, in quoting Lee, we come back to the issue not just of access to the net, but the information literacy, I refer to my question from 2.1. Is the person who can use the computer, more useful than the person who can understand the information that comes from it? I like the definitions of info lit provided. I like to mix them and say info literacy is the ability to use technology and to understand the relevance of, and how to use, the information provided. But the next page makes a good point, it is a mastery to be worked towards, and not obtained in finality.

VERY SCARY though is the Info lit programme I.Q. test. On a bad day I would say my school scores a ZERO! (but maybe I am just in a bad mood coz I am sick, I know that my immediate superiors have supported me and the score is really a lot higher).

Again ( and again) we come back to the role of advocacy to make all this happen. It is a bit of a theme almost everywhere I think.

I think to some up, Henri sees our role within the core business of the Info literate school as being a person who helps make the school and teachers info literate themselves so all can be involved in collaborative learning.

An example of this would be Tiki Levinson in http://www.nwrel.org/nwedu/09-01/cloak/place.pdf (sounds like a fun library).

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Experiment for the info revolved T.L.

Posted by arlekeno on April 7, 2009

聽PLEASE NOTE, This is an experiment, and I do not have permission yet from all the websites to link ( only some聽聽 EDIT: I now have permission from Project Gutenberg, USA and Australia to use their sights! Ask and it shall be given unto you re-edit. AND from the HUXLEY sight… the B.O.S. sight is already linked to schools I guess, so that is everyone.). This is from the NSW board of studies prescribed reading list for the HSC 2009/2012.

I have gone through public domain websites such as project gutenberg and found all the texts from the NSW HSC list that are available for free online.

I have then replaced the books ISBN number in the B.O.S. document with the link.

My aim would be to attach a document such as this to my school library webpage, so that students doing the HSC could download all their texts in either RTF, PDF or MP3 format to their new K.Rudd supplied Netbooks.

This would mean that any English lesson where a student had their netbook, they would also have their text.

I believe this is relvant to the role of the teacher librarian in supplying equal ( and cheap ) access to texts for study, relevant in our roles of information managers and copywrite experts and a good way to use the new resources being made available to Australian students.

I intend to do this for not just HSC, but all of High school English texts ( in public domain) and possibly for ancient history.

Alphabetical List of Prescribed Texts for HSC 2009鈥2012 Available online.

Author

Title

Publisher

Course Details

Type of Text

Austen, Jane

Northanger Abbey

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a68

Extension Module B

Texts and Ways of Thinking

Elective 2: Romanticism

Prose Fiction

Austen, Jane

Pride and Prejudice

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a68

Advanced Module A

Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Elective 1:

Exploring Connections

Prose Fiction

Blake, William

Selected Poems

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b#a295

Standard Module C

Texts and Society

Elective 2: Into the World

Poetry

Board of Studies

Speeches

Website:

www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au

Standard Module A

Experience Through Language Elective 1: Distinctive Voices

And

Advanced Module B

Critical Study of Texts

Non-fiction

Board of Studies

Workplace and Community Texts

Website: www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au

Standard Module C

Texts and Society

Elective 1: The Global Village

And

Elective 2: Into the World

And

ESL Module B

Texts and Society

Elective 1: Living and Working in the Community

Non-fiction

Board of Studies

Academic English

Website: www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au

ESL Module B

Texts and Society

Elective 2: Academic English

Non-fiction

Bronte, Charlotte

Jane Eyre

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b#a408

Advanced Module B

Critical Study of Texts

Prose Fiction

Bronte, Emily

Wuthering Heights

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b#a405

Extension Module B

Texts and Ways of Thinking

Elective 2: Romanticism

Prose Fiction

Browning, Elizabeth

Barrett

Aurora Leigh and Other Poems

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b#a781

Advanced Module A

Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Elective 2: Texts in Time

Poetry

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor

Samuel Taylor Coleridge: The Complete Poems

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/c#a95

Extension Module B

Texts and Ways of Thinking

Elective 2: Romanticism

Poetry

Dickens, Charles

Great Expectations

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/d#a37

Area of Study: Belonging

Prose Fiction

Dickinson, Emily

Selected Poems of Emily Dickinson (ed James Reeves)

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/d#a996

Area of Study: Belonging

And

ESL Area of Study: Belonging

Poetry

Donne, John

Selected Poetry

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/d#a8886

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0608871.txt

Advanced Module A

Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Elective 1: Exploring Connections

Poetry

Fitzgerald, F Scott

The Great Gatsby

http://gutenberg.net.au/plusfifty-a-m.html#fitzgerald

Advanced Module A

Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Elective 2: Texts in Time

Prose Fiction

Huxley, Aldous

Brave New World

http://www.huxley.net/bnw/index.html

Extension Module A

Genre

Elective 3: Science Fiction

Prose Fiction

Ibsen, Henrik

A Doll鈥檚 House

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/i#a861

Advanced Module B

Critical Study of Texts

Drama

Keats, John

Complete Poems

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/k#a935

Extension Module B

Texts and Ways of Thinking

Elective 2: Romanticism

Poetry

Lawson, Henry

The Penguin Henry Lawson Short Stories

http://gutenberg.net.au/pages/lawson.html

Standard Module A

Experience Through Language

Elective 2: Distinctively Visual

Prose Fiction (short stories)

Multicultural Programs Unit, NSW DET

Making Multicultural Australia

Website: http://www.multiculturalaustralia.edu.au

ESL Area of Study: Belonging

Multimedia

Orwell, George

George Orwell: Essays

http://gutenberg.net.au/pages/orwell.html

Advanced Module B

Critical Study of Texts

Non-fiction

Owen, Wilfred

War Poems and Others

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/o#a517

Standard Module B

Close Study of Text

Poetry

Paterson, A B

Penguin Banjo Paterson Collected Verse

http://gutenberg.net.au/pages/paterson.html

Standard Module A

Experience Through Language

Elective 1: Distinctive Voices

Poetry

Shakespeare, William

As You Like It

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a65

Area of Study: Belonging

Shakespeare

Shakespeare, William

Hamlet

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a65

Advanced Module B

Critical Study of Texts

Shakespeare

Shakespeare, William

Julius Caesar

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a65

Advanced Module C

Representation and Text

Elective 1:

Conflicting Perspectives

Shakespeare

Shakespeare, William

King Richard III

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a65

Advanced Module A

Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Elective 1:

Exploring Connections

Shakespeare

Shakespeare, William

The Merchant of Venice

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a65

Standard Module B

Close Study of Text

Drama

Shakespeare, William

Twelfth Night

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a65

Extension Module C

Language and Values

Elective 2:

Language and Gender

Drama

Shaw, George Bernard

Pygmalion

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a467

Standard Module A

Experience Through Language

Elective 1: Distinctive Voices

Drama

Shelley, Mary

Frankenstein

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a61

Advanced Module A

Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Elective 2: Texts in Time

Prose Fiction

Smithsonian National Museum of American History

September 11鈥 Bearing Witness

Website:

http://americanhistory.si.edu/september11/

Advanced Module C

Representation and Text

Elective 2:History and Memory

Multimedia

Wikimedia

Wikipedia鈥 The Free Encyclopedia

Website:

www.wikipedia.org

Standard Module C

Texts and Society

Elective 1: The Global Village

Multimedia

Woolf, Virginia

A Room of One鈥檚 Own

http://gutenberg.net.au/pages/woolf.html

Advanced Module A

Comparative Study of Texts and Context

Elective 2: Texts in Time

Non-fiction

Woolf, Virginia

Orlando

http://gutenberg.net.au/pages/woolf.html

Extension Module C

Language and Values

Elective 2:

Language and Gender

Prose Fiction

Yeats, William Butler

W B Yeats: Poems selected by Seamus Heaney

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/y#a1719

Advanced Module B

Critical Study of Texts

Poetry

Posted in Free the books., Library | 2 Comments »

Topic 2. The role of the teacher librarian

Posted by arlekeno on April 5, 2009

I was going to go down and comment on each section, but it all seems so blatantly obvious as just common sense or good teaching I did not bother, in short, THIS IS YOUR JOB, YOU KNOW THIS, DO IT!

(2004).聽Library standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians,

AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

1 Professional knowledge

Excellent teacher librarians鈥

1.1 understand the principles of lifelong learning

1.2 know about learning and teaching across curriculum areas and developmental levels

1.3 have a rich understanding of the school community and curriculum

1.4 have a specialist knowledge of information, resources, technology and library management

1.1 Knowledge of the principles of lifelong learning

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • are well-informed about information literacy theory and practice
  • thoroughly understand how all learners develop and apply lifelong learning skills and strategies
  • have a sound understanding of how children and young adults become independent readers
  • comprehensively understand the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in lifelong learning.

1.2 Knowledge of learning and teaching

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • have a detailed knowledge of current educational pedagogy
  • are thoroughly familiar with the information literacy and information needs, skills and interests of learners
  • fully understand the need to cater for the social, cultural and developmental backgrounds of learners in program implementation and curriculum resourcing

1.3 Knowledge of curriculum

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • have a comprehensive understanding of literacy, literature for children and young adults, curriculum and specific programs in their schools
  • have a detailed knowledge of how to promote and foster reading
  • have a sound understanding of current assessment theory and processes

1.4 Knowledge of library and information management

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • understand that professionally managed and resourced school libraries are crucial to the achievements of the school community
  • have a rich professional knowledge of national standards for library and information management 3
  • have a comprehensive understanding of national standards for information retrieval 4
AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

2 Professional practice

Excellent teacher librarians鈥

2.1 engage and challenge learners within a supportive, informationrich learning environment

2.2 collaboratively plan and resource curriculum programs which incorporate transferable information literacy and literature outcomes

2.3 provide exemplary library and information services consistent with national standards

2.4 evaluate student learning and library programs and services to inform professional practice

2.1 Learning environment

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • create and nurture an information-rich learning environment which supports the needs of the school community
  • provide access to information resources through efficient, effective and professionally-managed system
  • foster an environment where learners are encouraged and empowered to read, view, listen and respond for understanding and enjoyment
  • appreciate the dynamic nature of ICTs and their role in education

2.2 Learning and teaching

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • collaborate with teachers to plan and implement information literacy and literature programs that result in positive student learning outcomes
  • ensure that their programs are responsive to the needs of learners in the school community
  • support learning and teaching by providing equitable access to professionally-selected resources
  • assist individual learners to develop independence in their learning
  • teach the appropriate and relevant use of ICTs and information resources

2.3 Library and information services management

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • ensure that the library’s policies and procedures implement the school’s mission
  • provide exemplary reference and information services to the school community
  • strategically plan and budget for improvement in library and information services and programs
  • apply information management practices and systems that are consistent with national standards 4

2.4 Evaluation

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • monitor teaching practice to ensure improved learning and teaching
  • evaluate student learning to provide evidence of progress in information literacy and reading
  • measure library resources, facilities, programs and services against current policies, standards documents and benchmarks
  • use evidence to inform programs and services
AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

3 Professional commitment

Excellent teacher librarians鈥

3.1 model and promote lifelong learning

3.2 commit to the principles of education and librarianship

3.3 demonstrate leadership within school and professional communities

3.4 actively participate in education and library professional networks

3.1 Lifelong learning

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • empower others in the school community to become lifelong learners
  • undertake research which informs evidence-based innovation in school library programs
  • engage in debate on educational issues within the school community
  • create and foster library-related professional development opportunities for staff

3.2 Commitment

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • are dedicated to excellence in professional service
  • emphasise a learning and teaching focus in school library programs and services
  • promote the profession of teacher librarianship in their schools and the wider community
  • foster a reading culture through the active promotion of literature
  • participate in continuing professional development

3.3 Leadership

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • actively engage in school leadership and participate in key committees
  • promote and nurture a 鈥榳hole school focus鈥 on information literacy policy and implementation
  • build and foster collaborative teams within school and professional communities
  • provide effective and transformational leadership to school library and information services staff

3.4 Community responsibilities

Excellent teacher librarians:

  • model the sharing of knowledge
  • actively participate as members of professional communities
  • demonstrate collegiality and mentor colleagues
  • promote library and information services to the school and the wider community

Posted in Library | Leave a Comment »

Topic 2: T.L. Role Statements and Standards.

Posted by arlekeno on April 5, 2009

I have already talked about what the role of the T.L. is, I think I will need to go over the standards from ASLA again in another blog and compare it to my second post.

Response to Watts: The teacher librarian past: A literature review,

What is the role of the T.L.?

Again talk of advocacy, who else knows what we do?

Schools are changing, let鈥檚 take advantage of it?

I am reminded of Homer Simpson and the old saying in China that the word for crisis is the same as opportunity鈥 CRISOTUNITY!

But it does make sense, with the arrival of the new netbooks, we can step up as leaders and make people notice the library with the new technology.

Collaborate with I.T. staff: at my school the I.T. head teacher is the library head teacher, I think this is a good thing and makes our success more likely.

I also have thought before on our role with the web (see topic one blogs)

T.L. can be a reviewer of Electronic info, as Stoll (97) and Drive magazine (99) question the information and service of net.

There is no dichotomy of technology and library.

I was interested in the view that

Being able to use the technology is more important than being able to understand what it finds!

I will have to ask about that when I face it again.

Is knowing how to make a book more important than being able to read it?

The talk of I.T. and the I-age revolution did lead me to ask a question.

At present most T.L.s are ex English teachers, in future will they be ex I.T. teachers?

Future role someone who woks in a biblio tech, will be a Tech head and a biblio phile!

Most of the Roll statements for T.L.s mention T.L.s are leaders.

All this talk of leadership, but are the executive and other staff willing to accept it?

And will this eventually lead to less library work? The need for more technicians or under T.Ls to assist?

More management and collaboration. Less face to face time for students and less time for general admin of biblio.

Response to ASLA: http://www.asla.org.au/policy/teacher.librarian.qualifications.htm

And Learning for the Future (2001).

More or less the same, not surprising as they are both by ASLA.

But he book is easier to understand and refer to, also a little more in depth.

Curriculum leaders, info specialists and info services managers.

Interested to see that ASLA wants people to be trained as T.L.s before starting work in the biblio. I doubt his happens much, if at all.

Posted in Library | 1 Comment »